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Title: Joseph "Crazy Joey" Gallo
Description: Mob Legend


GangstersInc - July 17, 2007 06:35 PM (GMT)
I recently finished Leroy Nicky Barnes' book. In it he speaks very highly of Gallo. Saying "Joey Gallo got big motherfuckin' respect. Big respect." A funny anecdote: Gallo sat with the muslims (in prison) and complained the spaghetti needed pork sausage! Just to fuck with us a little."

Barnes alleges a conversation in which Gallo hinted at a partnership, but nothing more. We have all read about Gallo's intentions of incorporating blacks and latinos into his criminal empire. Yet at that time he still had the advantage as a Italian/white criminal. My question is did Gallo do any business/form partnerships with other ethnic crime groups? Or was he just thinking out loud being philosophical?

user posted image

Beer&Blood - September 18, 2007 03:58 PM (GMT)
Crazy Joe was a young turk. He had many famous friends like NYC actor Jerry Orbach (who just had a street named after him on 53rd Street).

Gallo's involvement of integrating his gang was smart, and innovative, and controversial to the family. He also had a dwarf in his gang.

I always enjoyed watching the film CRAZY JOE with Peter Boyle and the diminutive Herve Villachaize.

In the film, Gallo helps diffuse a prison race riot and befriends a black drug dealer. The black character, played by action actor Fred Williamson, was never really fleshed out but he could have been based off Nicky Barnes.

Hollander - July 4, 2008 12:30 AM (GMT)
Was he killed by Frank Sheeran? And what are the names of the other 13 killed by Sheeran/John Francis?
http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:Nhenh...clnk&cd=6&gl=nl

MickyS - July 4, 2008 05:09 PM (GMT)
Gallo was killed by a guy called Sonny Pinto, real name Carmine Di Diase, and 3 others. One guy panicked a few days later, and went to police, claiming he was going to be killed next. Di Biase was never caught.

His helping witht he riots in prison, and closness to Black inmates, is Hollywood hype, as is his status. He was tough, but not super tough. He was not well liked by anyone, and i think Barnes was just throwing his name in to help hype his life story sales. I doubt very much they hung out in streets together. His trouble with fellow mobsters was his attitude, and his mouth. Reporters were being fed stories that mob hated him cause he was friends with Black people, but that was just to fuel animosity between Mafia and Black public in New York.

Gallo did get to hang out with Jerry Orbach, he was hanging around at celebrity parties, being shown off as some sort of oddity, while he was thinking he was a star or something.

Hollander - July 4, 2008 11:39 PM (GMT)


Frank Sheeran says it was under orders from Russell Bufalino (1903-1994), Boss of the Pennsylvania-New York Cosa Nostra Family, that he whacked the "fresh kid." John "The Redhead" Francis was Sheeran's wheelman.


"I walked in the Mulberry Street door. I went straight inside toward the bar, and I kept my back to the Mulberry Street side of the room where Gallo was. I turned and ended up facing the table with the people. I was a bit startled to see a little girl with the people, but sometimes you saw that in the fighting overseas. A split second after I turned to face the table, Crazy Joey Gallo's driver got shot from behind. The women and the little girl dove under the table. Crazy Joey swung around out of his chair and headed down toward the corner door to the shooter's right. Could be he was trying to draw fight away from the table, or could be he was just trying to save himself, but most likely he was trying to do both. It was easy to cut him off by going straight down the bar to the door and getting right behind him. He made it through Umberto's corner door to the outside. Crazy Joey got shot about three times outside the restaurant not far from the corner door. Could be he had his piece in the car and was going for the car. He had no chance of making it. Crazy Joey Gallo went to Australia on his birthday on a bloody city sidewalk.


The stories that are out there say that there were three shooters, but I'm not saying that. Maybe the bodyguard added two shooters to make himself look better. Maybe there were a lot of stray shots being fired from the two guns that made it seem like there was more than one shooter. I'm not putting anybody else in the thing but me.


Later on, I heard some Italian guy took credit for the whack they put on Gallo. That's okay by me" (pp. 219-220).


If Frankos, Hoffman and Headley, (January 1, 1992) are indeed engaged in an attempt to elevate Mad Joe Dog Sullivan to the status of an underworld folk hero, that attempt may be better understood by means of comparative content analysis, i.e. how are the Crazy Joe Gallo Hit and the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa rendered in Contract Killer (Hoffman and Headley, January 1, 1992) as compared to "I Heard You Paint Houses" (Charles Brandt, June 1, 2004)?


Hollander - July 4, 2008 11:48 PM (GMT)
When Rudolph Guiliani was a federal prosecutor, he named Sheeran as one of only two non-Italians on The Commisson, the ruling body of the American Mafia. In his capacity as a high official in the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Sheeran was a leading figure in the corruption of unions by organized crime

Hollander - July 5, 2008 12:19 AM (GMT)
Giuliani's RICO suit against the mob;

The Commision of La Cosa Nostra

Anthony Salerno
Matthew Ianniello
Anthony Provenzano
Nunzio Provenzano
Anthony Corallo
Salvatore Santoro
Christopher Furnari Sr.
Frank Manzo
Carmine Persico
Gennaro Langella
Philip Rastelli
Nicholas Marangello
Joseph Massino
Anthony Ficarotta
Eugene Boffa Sr.
Francis Sheeran
Milton Rockman
John Tronolone
Joseph Aiuppa
John Cerone
Joseph Lombardo
Angelo LaPietra
Frank Balistrieri
Carl DeLuna
Carl Civella
Anthony Civella

Galante - July 7, 2008 04:42 PM (GMT)
does anyone know anything about Joey Gallos other brother Lawrence? I know Albert is an acting captain in the Genovese family.

GangstersInc - July 7, 2008 09:11 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (MickyS @ Jul 4 2008, 06:09 PM)
Gallo was killed by a guy called Sonny Pinto, real name Carmine Di Diase, and 3 others. One guy panicked a few days later, and went to police, claiming he was going to be killed next. Di Biase was never caught.

His helping witht he riots in prison, and closness to Black inmates, is Hollywood hype, as is his status. He was tough, but not super tough. He was not well liked by anyone, and i think Barnes was just throwing his name in to help hype his life story sales. I doubt very much they hung out in streets together. His trouble with fellow mobsters was his attitude, and his mouth. Reporters were being fed stories that mob hated him cause he was friends with Black people, but that was just to fuel animosity between Mafia and Black public in New York.

Gallo did get to hang out with Jerry Orbach, he was hanging around at celebrity parties, being shown off as some sort of oddity, while he was thinking he was a star or something.

Barnes only said they talked and played a bit of chess while in prison. And Barnes' links to Matty Madonna do make the story more plausible. He already had a connection to the Italians.

I do agree about Gallo being a very hyped up gangster, but do think there is some truth to the stories. I think Gallo got lost in his own hype, and started losing his view on reality though.

Good observation about him being the freakshow at celebrity parties. Don Rickles also has an anecdote where he meets the Gallos and Rickles' mom tells the Gallos Don will only talk with them if their guns are on the table. So the Gallos and Don Rickles talked, in front of a table with guns LOL.

puparo - July 8, 2008 11:54 AM (GMT)


the number crazy joey by Bob Dylan is about Joey gallo


when you know that


it is fun to listen to the numbers text

GangstersInc - July 8, 2008 01:35 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (puparo @ Jul 8 2008, 12:54 PM)
the number crazy joey by Bob Dylan is about Joey gallo


when you know that


it is fun to listen to the numbers text

Great song, but sung by a fan LOL:

"Joey"

Born in Red Hook Brooklyn in the year of who knows when
Opened up his eyes to the tune of an accordion
Always on the outside whatever side there was
When they asked him why it had to be that way "Well" he answered "just because".

Larry was the oldest Joey was next to last
They called Joe "Crazy" the baby they called "Kid Blast"
Some say they lived off gambling and running numbers too
It always seemed they got caught between the mob and the men in blue.

Joey, Joey
King of the streets child of clay
Joey, Joey
What made them want to come and blow you away.

There was talk they killed their rivals but the truth was far from that
No one ever knew for sure where they were really at
When they tried to strangle Larry, Joey almost hit the roof
He went out that night to seek revenge thinking he was bulletproof.

The war broke out at the break of dawn it emptied out the streets
Joey and his brothers suffered terrible defeats
Till they ventured out behind the lines and took five prisoners
They stashed them away in a basement called them amateurs.

The hostages were trembling when they heard a man exclaim
"Let's blow this place to kingdom come let Con Edison take the blame"
But Joey stepped up, and he raised his hand and said, "We're not those kind of men
It's peace and quiet that we need to go back to work again".

Joey, Joey
King of the streets child of clay
Joey, Joey
What made them want to come and blow you away.

The police department hounded him, they called him Mr. Smith
They got him on conspiracy, they were never sure who with
"What time is it" said the judge to Joey when they met
"Five to ten" said Joey. The judge says, "That's exactly what you get".

He did ten years in Attica, reading Nietzche and Wilhelm Reich
They threw him in the hole one time for trying to stop a strike
His closest friends were black men 'cause they seemed to understand
What it's like to be in society with a shackle on your hand.

When they let him out in '71 he'd lost a little weight
But he dressed like Jimmy Cagney and I swear he did look great
He tried to find the way back into the life he left behind
To the boss he said, "I've returned and now I want what's mine".

Joey, Joey
King of the streets child of clay
Joey, Joey
What made them want to come and blow you away.

It was true that in his later years he would not carry a gun
"I'm around too many children", he'd say, "they should never know of one"
Yet he walked right into the clubhouse of his lifelong deadly foe
Emptied out his register, said, "Tell 'em it was Crazy Joe".

One day they blew him down in a clam bar in New York
He could see it coming through the doors as he lifted up his fork
He pushed the table over to protect his family
Then he staggered out into the streets of Little Italy.

Joey, Joey
King of the streets child of clay
Joey, Joey
What made them want to come and blow you away.

Sister Jacqueline and Carmela and mother Mary all did weep
I heard his best friend Frankie say, "He ain't dead he's just asleep"
Then I saw the old man's limousine head back towards the grave
I guess he had to say one last goodbye to the son that he could not save.

The sun turned cold over President Street and the town of the Brooklyn mourned
They said a mass in the old church near the house where he was born
And someday if God's in heaven overlooking his preserve
I know the men that shot him down will get what they deserve.

Joey, Joey
King of the streets child of clay
Joey, Joey
What made them want to come and blow you away.

[ www.azlyrics.com ]

Galante - July 8, 2008 08:42 PM (GMT)
this is the only mafia rap video i like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4et8Dt6rco

MickyS - July 9, 2008 05:32 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Galante @ Jul 7 2008, 10:42 AM)
does anyone know anything about Joey Gallos other brother Lawrence? I know Albert is an acting captain in the Genovese family.

He died of throat cancer before Joe Gallo was killed.

GangstersInc - April 23, 2009 04:55 PM (GMT)
New book about the Gallos:

Author website: http://www.tomfolsom.com/

Author
Tom Folsom
Publication Date
May 05, 2009
ISBN
978-1-60286-081-0
Format
Hardcover
Category
Nonfiction

The Mad Ones:
Crazy Joe Gallo and the Revolution at the Edge of the Underworld

The Mad Ones chronicles the rise and fall of the Gallo brothers, a trio of reckless young gangsters whose revolution against New York City's Mafia was inspired by Crazy Joe Gallo's forays into Greenwich Village counterculture.

Crazy Joe, Kid Blast, and Larry Gallo are steeped in legend, from Bob Dylan's eleven-minute ballad "Joey" to fictionalizations central to The Godfather trilogy and Jimmy Breslin's The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight. Called the toughest gang in the city by the NYPD, the Gallos hailed from the rough Red Hook neighborhood on the Brooklyn waterfront. As low-level Mafiosi, they were expected to serve their Don quietly, but the brothers stood apart from typical gangsters with their hip style, fierce ambition, and Crazy Joe's manic idealism.

Joey aspired to be more than a common hood and immersed himself among the Beatniks and bohemians of the Village. Yearning to live the life of an artist, Joey wrote poetry, painted, and got his kicks devouring existential philosophy. Celebrated as the "king of the streets" by Dylan, Joey was embraced by the city's leading cultural figures as an antihero straight out of Camus.

Here, for the first time, is the complete story of the Gallos's war against the powerful Cosa Nostra, an epic crime saga that culminates in Crazy Joe's murder on the streets of Little Italy, where he was gunned down mid-bite into a forkful of spaghetti in 1972. The Mad Ones is wildly satisfying entertainment and a significant work of cultural history.

Review

"Riveting, richly atmospheric pulp nonfiction...prose as tight and hard-boiled as any James Ellroy novel...[a] novelistic study of an iconoclastic criminal in revolutionary times."
(Kirkus Reviews (starred review) )

"In vivid style-part Puzo, part Kerouac-Tom Folsom takes the reader back to a time when the underworld and the counterculture seemed to be on parallel tracks. Brutal and elegiac, the story of Crazy Joe and the Gallo brothers is one for the ages. The Mad Ones belongs on a shelf alongside the best of Breslin and Pileggi." (T.J. ENGLISH, author of Havana Nocturne and The Westies )

Product Details

* Hardcover: 256 pages
* Publisher: Weinstein Books (May 5, 2009)




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